Please get in touch at karen@karenloew.com to discuss an assignment or collaborate.

Film

My short dance film No Man's Land premiered June 29, 2017 at the 14th Street Y.  The film, and accompanying exhibit about the East River beach at Stuyvesant Cove Park, were on view in the Y's lobby gallery through Labor Day. The Y is located at 344 East 14th Street, just west of First Avenue.

In 2012, I also directed and produced a short film about that very location: 14th Street and 1st Ave.  It's called Intersection: Babel.

Neighborhood Preservation

Involved in a variety of efforts to preserve the built, cultural and small business assets of New York City, particularly the East Village.  Available for preservation consulting.

Public Speaking & Events

Let me interview someone interesting or put together an incisive panel for your organization.  I can also give a real stemwinder of a sermon or speech.   See Events page. 

Nonfiction Book

Alone in the Valley: A Rookie Reporter in America's Cultural Divide is the true story of a big controversy in a small town, and of a young person’s journey (mine) as a fledgling reporter responsible for covering it.
     The tale takes nonfiction narrative to a new place by marrying the professional coming-of-age story to a specific public policy question.  It’s a “democratic procedural” that follows the twists and turns of a yearlong struggle over taxes in Warren County, Virginia. At issue was whether to raise taxes in order to build two public schools. Throw a dart at a map of America, and you’ll hit a place facing a similar question.
     In the storied Shenandoah Valley, the cast of characters – including working-class natives, urban newcomers, and a stealthy Christian right – embody our hot-button issues around taxes, religion and education.
     A look at this American microcosm helps readers understand the currents buffeting education, government and the news media that continue to shape our communities and our country – and threaten to leave us behind.

 The Shenandoah Valley:  In 'God's country,' small-town events feel broadly resonant.

The Shenandoah Valley:  In 'God's country,' small-town events feel broadly resonant.